Tag archive for "Powerchair"

stairlift

New Products.(commode lift; tub slide shower chair; independent shower chair; Vangater II lift; mobility seat; exercise station; Rascal powerchair; Levo … wheelchair): An article from: Palaestra

No Comments 26 September 2010

New Products.(commode lift; tub slide shower chair; independent shower chair; Vangater II lift; mobility seat; exercise station; Rascal powerchair; Levo … wheelchair): An article from: Palaestra

This digital document is an article from Palaestra, published by Challenge Publications Limited on June 22, 1999. The length of the article is 661 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: New Products.(commode lift; tub slide shower chair; independent shower chair; Vangater II

List Price: $ 5.95

Price: $ 5.95

stairlift

Electric Wheelchair or Powerchair – Which Should you Choose?

No Comments 05 September 2010

Electric Wheelchair or Powerchair – Which Should you Choose?

Electric wheelchairs are either rear or front wheel driven. Some of them are center driven or four wheel driven. These powerchairs come in many varieties like small portable models, foldable models, and models that can be dis-assembled. Large, full-featured electric wheelchairs that are called rehab chairs are also available. Powerchairs are designed for persons who have arm and leg disablement. Such people would find the operations of hand propelled wheelchairs quite difficult.

Electric wheelchairs are fitted with electric motors that are powered by 4 to 5 ampere rechargeable batteries. These motors are outboard boat engine types. The batteries come in dry or wet types. Dry type batteries are the most preferred ones due to ease of operation and maintenance. Electric wheelchairs are also fitted with battery chargers so that plugging into standard wall outlets is easy.

Operating either a joystick or a controller usually controls electric wheelchairs. Hand controllers, chin controllers, puff/sack controllers are specifically designed for persons with varying degrees of operational difficulty. The controller is the most expensive part of powerchairs and is quite delicate. Electric wheelchairs come with several optional functions like tilting, reclining seat and leg elevators, etc. to facilitate healthy and functional operations.

Electric wheelchairs for kids are generally those used by mentally disabled children or children affected by polio. These wheelchairs are custom made to suit the age of the child as well as the usage like indoors or outdoors or both. Polio affected kids and paraplegics were using hand supports till a few decades ago. Such hand supports normally resulted in severe body strain to the kids. The advent of electric wheelchair for kids has greatly relieved such kids of their suffering.

Travel had been on the rise and persons using wheelchairs are no exception. Traveling on vacation, travel for education, employment or participation in sports meets and general commuting for shopping, etc. have become indispensable for persons using electric wheelchairs. Portable and foldable models of wheelchairs require storage space, when not being used. As such, public transports like buses, trains and airplanes specifically provide electric wheelchair carriers. Buses with low boarding platforms that can literally lift wheelchairs into the buses have also been designed to serve such people. Such platforms are electrically or hydraulically operated.

Nowadays, in the United States, sales and service facilities for electric wheelchairs are quite widespread. You do not have to go too far to buy an electric wheelchair of your choice. As these powerchairs are made-to-order types, deliveries take some time but are normally very reliable. Electric wheelchair parts repair has also become quite easy, reliable and economical due to the healthy competition between the various electric wheelchair manufacturers.

Operation of an electric wheelchair by patients or disabled persons carries a certain amount of risk. Accidents could not be avoided at one time or another. Such accidents could be minor or major. Hence, insurance companies provide both accident/life insurance policies, as well as medicare policies to cover such risks. It is always advisable to take suitable insurance policies for physical and financial protection. Electric wheelchairs and medicare go hand-in-hand for persons confined to wheelchairs.

Electric power scooters, or mobility scooters as they are called, are normally fitted with two rear wheels, a seat with a flat area to place the feet and a handlebar in the front to operate one or two steerable front wheels. Swiveling seats are also available. Electric power scooters are invariably electric powered by rechargeable batteries that could be charged from standard electric outlets. Certain models of mobile scooters are gasoline-powered. Such electric power scooters have been most welcome for persons confined to wheelchairs. They find such scooters handy for commuting to schools and colleges as well as to workplaces and shopping. Electric power scooters are normally cheaper than powerchairs. Insurance companies and healthcare agencies like Medicare prefer to insure or extend medicare facilities for people using such scooters.

Eric Comforth is a consultant who writes on many consumer topics. There is more wheelchair information at
Wheelchairs For You.

SCV’s 2002 version of electric wheelchair!! User Kleanorfuzz has been blocked, so there is no need to respond to his comments anymore. Just ignore the fool, ok?
Video Rating: 4 / 5

stairlift

What is the Difference Between a Mobility Scooter and a Powerchair?

No Comments 19 August 2010

What is the Difference Between a Mobility Scooter and a Powerchair?

What Is the Difference Between a Mobility Scooter and a Powerchair?

Mobility scooters and powerchairs are often grouped together to differentiate them from traditional self-propelled, or pushed manual wheelchairs. There are however some fundamental differences between a mobility scooter and a powerchair.

Mobility scooters have three or four wheels and are steered using a bicycle style handlebar (or tiller) which requires two hands, and are designed to travel up to 35 miles. They are often used by people with limited mobility, or those who tire easily when walking. Depending on the model and type of mobility scooter, the scooter may dissemble into easy to manage components so that it can be easily transported in a car, or stored at home.

Powerchairs usually look more like traditional wheelchairs, and some models even look just like a traditional wheelchair with batteries and a motor attached to each wheel. The powerchair is driven using one hand by a joystick controller on the arm of the powerchair. Powerchair users tend to spend more time in their chairs than scooter users spend on their scooters. Because of this, powerchairs are usually more adaptable than disabled scooters and some models can have specialist seats and controllers fitted to suit the individual requirements of the user. For example, the powerchair can be controlled by hand, by a chin controller, or even using a sip and puff pipe operated with the mouth. The footrests can be specific to the user’s needs and can include swing away or articulating footrests. Powerchairs are also more likely to be used inside although some powerchairs are equally capable indoors and outdoors. Mobility scooters are more likely to be used outdoors, although some of the smaller ones can be used indoors.

Electric scooters usually have one motor to drive the rear wheels whilst powerchairs have two motors to individually drive the rear wheels. This gives the powerchair a smaller turning circle which is ideal for indoor use, and provides a lot of traction and control. Some powerchairs even have the option of an electrically operated hydraulic seat so that the user can reach traditionally unreachable places like cupboards and shelves. Disabled scooters tend to be less configurable than powerchairs, and have fewer optional extras.

Disability scooters tend to be less expensive than powerchairs. Powerchairs have two motors, and better, more supportive seating as users often spend a lot of time in the powerchair. Powerchair users may not be able to support themselves, or be able to walk at all, and so their requirements are different from mobility scooter users.

Traditionally, powerchairs were not as easy to dismantle as mobility scooters, but this is changing and most of the powerchair manufacturers offer powerchairs that will fit into a car boot. Designs are constantly changing and improving, and powerchairs are becoming as easy to dismantle and as rugged as mobility scooters. Some powerchairs have six wheels for added stability, and some are front wheel drive for added indoor maneuverability.

Now that you have found out more about the differences between mobility scooters and powerchairs, you can decide which will best suit your needs.

For more information about mobility scooters and powerchairs, please visit www.scootamart.com



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